Category Archives: Removal Of Hazards

a sign declaring the national prescription drug take back day

The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Is This Saturday, Oct. 27th of 2018!

This Saturday, Oct. 27th of 2018, the DEA has organized a National Prescription Drug Take Back Day throughout the entire Country. This is one way of helping to deal with the opioid crisis that has been declared a national crisis recently.

MedWaste Management will provide continued coverage of take back event as well as other efforts being made to help with our opioid crisis.

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

As President Trump signed legislation providing resources to help end our opioid crisis, representatives of companies pledging to help stood behind.

You can watch footage of the President with others discussing our opioid crisis and about the things that our Country is doing to stop it, including prescription drug take back events, and more responsible doctor prescribing.

Behind him stood representatives of companies pledging to help with the crisis. Representatives from Google, Walgreens and CVS were there, among others, promoting tools to help dispose of prescription drugs safely and securely. (22.00 minutes into the video)

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

needles and medicines at the home

How do I dispose of home generated medical waste?

Click here for a list of FREE approved locations to drop off home medical waste at, in California.

How do I dispose of home-generated medical waste?

Package It: Make sure to package your home sharps waste and needles in approved travel sized or medium sized or large sharps containers. This will allow the waste to be safely handled and transported for disposal . If you don’t yet have a sharps container, try packaging your sharps waste in a heavy duty plastic container, such as a laundry detergent bottle, for the meanwhile. Medicine waste can be packaged in a rigid container. Any printed information about the medicine or prescribed patient, should be erased or covered. 

Dispose Of It: Bring your home generated medical waste to your local California State approved collection site for free and proper disposal.  Remember, all sharps waste must be properly packaged.   For medicine waste, check which of the collection sites on the list indicate that they also accept medicines for disposal.

The not free free option: If you need a professional company to come collect and dispose of your medical waste, contact MedWaste Management at (866) 254-5105. We collect and dispose of all types of medical waste, from all types of facilities in California, such as healthcare facilities, schools, homes and businesses. Since this disposal option is not free, it is recommended for the disposal of large quantities of home generated medical waste, or anyone who wants to pay for this convenience.

What is home-generated medical waste? 

In Septemebr 2008, it became illegal in California to place your home-generated sharps waste in the regular trash container, or to flush it down the toilet.

  • Sharps Waste – Home-generated sharps waste means hypodermic needles, pen needles, intravenous needles, lancets, and other devices that are used to penetrate the skin for the delivery of medications derived from a household, including a multifamily residence or household. See California’s Medical Waste Management Act section 117671.
  • Medicine Waste – Home-generated medicine waste means expired or unused medicines, whether prescription or over the counter.

Browse For Local California County Info:

Alameda County:

Alameda County – Find information about how to properly dispose of home generated sharps and medicine waste in Alameda County, CA.

Alameda County Medication Drop Off Sites – Find the 41 locations, where Alameda County residents can drop off unwanted prescription and Over-the-Counter drugs and medications, including controlled substances.

Alameda County Public Health Dept. –  Find information about how to properly dispose of home generated sharps waste in Alameda County, CA.

CityofLivermore.net  Find information about how to properly dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Livermore, CA.

StopWaste.org – Find out where to dispose of of sharps waste and medicine waste in the cities of Fremont, Hayward, Livermore and Oakland, in Alameda County, CA.

Alpine County:

Amador County:

Butte County:

Butte County –  Find information about how to properly dispose of home generated sharps waste in Butte County, CA.

CityofOroville.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Oroville, CA.

Calaveras County:

Colusa County:

Countyof Colusa.org – Learn and see a video about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Orange County, CA.

Contra Costa County:

ContraCostacountyhealth.org – Learn more about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Orange County, CA.

DeltaDiablo.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Delta Diablo District, in East Contra Costa County, CA.

PleasantHill.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Pleasant Hill, CA.

Del Norte County:

El Dorado County:

ElDoradoCountygov.us – Learn more about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in El Dorado County, CA.

Fresno County:

Glenn County:

Humboldt County:

Imperial County:

Inyo County:

Kern County:

KernCountywaste.com – Learn about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Kern County, CA.

Kings County:

Lake County:

Lassen County:

Los Angeles County:

Azusa.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Azusa, CA.

AgouraHills.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Agoura Hills, CA.

Calrecycle.ca.gov – Find locations throughout California that will accept a variety of special wastes.

Calrecycle.ca.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in California.

CityofBell.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Bell, CA.

Lakewoodcity.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Lakewood, CA.

dpwLAcounty.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Los Angeles County, CA.

MontereyPark.ca.govLearn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Monterey Park, CA.

Madera County:

Marin County:

MarinCounty.org  – Learn more about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Marin County, CA.

Mariposa County:

Mendocino County:

Merced County:

Modoc County:

Mono County:

Monterey County:

Napa County:

CountyofNapa.org – Learn about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Napa County, CA.

Nevada County:

KeepTruckeeGreena.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Truckee, CA.

Orange County:

FountainValley.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medicine waste in the city of Fountain Valley, CA.

LaHabracity.org – Learn about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of La Habra, CA.

Orangecounty.com – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Orange County, CA.

Orangecountyhealth.com – Learn more about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Orange County, CA.

RanchoSantaMargarita.org – Learn about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA.

SanJuanCapistrano.org – Learn about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of San Juan Capistrano, CA.

Placer County:

RecyclinginLincoln.com – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Lincoln, CA.

Plumas County:

CountyofPlumas –  Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste waste in Plumas County, CA.

Riverside County:

Coronaca.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Corona, CA.

Riversidecounty.org –  Find information about how to properly dispose of home generated sharps waste in Riverside County, CA.

CityofCommerce.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Commerce, CA.

Temeculaca.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Temecula, CA.

Sacramento County:

CityofSacramento.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated hazardous waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Sacramento, CA.

San Benito County:

San Bernardino County:

Adelentoca.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Adelento, CA.

AppleValley.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the town of Apple Valley, CA.

CityofChino.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Chino, CA.

CityofCommerce.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Commerce, CA.

Fontana.org –  Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Fontana, CA.

SanBernardinoCounty.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medication waste in Los Angeles County, CA.

Victorville.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Los Angeles County, CA.

San Diego County:

Oceanside.ca.us – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Oceanside, CA.

Poway.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medication waste in the city of Poway, CA.

CityofSanteeca.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Santee, CA.

San Joaquin County:

Stocktongov.com – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medicine waste in the city of Stockton, CA.

San Luis Obispo County:

SanLuisObispoCountyiwma.com – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in San Luis Obispo County, CA.

Santa Clara County:

MountainView.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medicine waste in the city of Mountain View, CA.

San Diego County:

SanDiegocounty.gov – Learn how to dispose of home generated hazardous waste and pharmaceutical waste in San Diego County, CA.

San Francisco County:

San Joaquin County:

San Luis Obispo County:

San Mateo:

SanMateoCountyhealth.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in San Mateo County, CA.

Santa Barbara County:

CountyofSantaBarbara.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Santa Barbara County, CA.

Santa Clara County:

SantaClara.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medicine waste in Santa Clara County, CA.

SantaClaraFireDept.org – Learn more about how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and medicine waste in Santa Clara County, CA.

Santa Cruz County:

Shasta County:

Sierra County:

Siskiyou County:

Solano County:

Sonoma County:

RecycleNow.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Sonoma County, CA.

Stanislaus County:

Stanislauscounty.com – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Stanislaus County, CA.

Sutter County:

YubaSutterRecycles.com –  Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in Sutter County, CA.

Tehama County:

Trinity County:

Tulare County:

Visalia.city – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in the city of Visalia, CA.

Tuolumne County:

Ventura County:

Simivalley.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Simi Valley, CA.

VenturaCountyrma.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Ventura County, CA.

VenturaCountypublicworks.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated pharmaceutical waste in Ventura County, CA.

Yolo County:

CityofDavis.org – Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical waste in the city of Davis, CA.

Yolocounty.org –  Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste in Sonoma County, CA.

Yuba County:

YubaSutterRecycles.com –  Learn how to dispose of home generated sharps waste and pharmaceutical in Yuba County, CA.

How can I accept home-generated medical waste at my health care facility or business?

If you have a medical facility or business that generated medical waste, and you already properly dispose of your medical waste, you can easily start accepting home-generated medical waste from your patients and community.

Just make sure of the following:

  • The sharps must be contained in an approved sharps container.
  • The generator of the home-generated sharps waste, or a member of his or her family, must bring the sharps waste to your facility.
  • The sharps waste is accepted at a central location at your facility.
  • You must properly dispose of the home-generated medical waste that you accept, just as your properly dispose of your facility’s medical waste.
  •  A reference to, and a description of, the above actions are
    included in your facility’s medical waste management plan.

See California’s Medical Waste Management Act Section 118147.

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

Medical Waste Products 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

Flu Season: Medical Waste Disposal at Home

FLU SEASON! Tips from your medical waste disposal expert.index

Some chiropractors look at people and “see” invisible lines going through their spines. Speech therapists hear little divergences in people’s accents. Barbers notice hairstyles. Teachers notice things that need fixing. I notice places with contamination potential.

Medical waste disposal is all about identifying which medical items can potentially spread pathogens, containing them, and destroying them. I’ve started, however, to notice contamination potential in everyday items as well. Doorknobs, for example. Computer keyboards. Cars with the windows shut and a passenger who’s a carrier…. Don’t ask.

So, here are some tips about handwashing, which has been proven effective at minimizing your potential of getting or giving out germs.

1. Wash your Hands.

I know you’ve heard this before. Keep in mind that if you are just not going to get into the habit of washing your hands regularly, it’s important to wash your hands after using the bathroom, after coughing or sneezing, before and after handling food, after coming into contact with an animal, and probably after coming into contact with something that a LOT of other people come into contact with on a regular basis… like doorknobs.

2. Wash your Hands with Soap.

You need a minimum of 15 to 30 seconds scrubbing time with antibacterial soap to really remove bacteria from your hands. Don’t forget to scrub between your fingers and the area at the base of your palms. Bacteria gets there, too.

3. Dry your Hands.

Once the soap loosened all the bacteria, you need to make sure none of it sticks right back to your skin. The easiest way to transfer bacteria is with wet hands. So dry your hands.

4. Dry your Hands on a Paper Towel.

Air-drying devices can actually increase bacteria count, and also blow germs around in a three to six feet perimeter from the device. Paper towels remove the germs and then they get thrown out into the garbage can. This gives them less potential to infect somebody else with the germs on them.

5. Consider cleaning surfaces

Use products with anti-microbial and disinfectant properties to maximize cleanliness. The easy way to sterilize home surfaces is with wipes. Also, when you clean the floors, clean each area separately, using another microfiber cloth, to avoid cross-contamination. (Meaning, don’t wash the floor in your child’s bedroom, where he’s been hanging out with a bad cold, and then use the same mop on the dining room floor. You’ll be spreading the bedroom germs all over the dining room.)’

Also, you might consider carrying wipes around with you and using them on doorknobs and shopping cart handles, and the like…. places that many people have put their germs on.

6. If you or anyone in your household is ill, use a crude medical waste disposal bio-hazardous waste precaution and double-bag tissues in a separate garbage can. YOu can get a small container and keep it in the bedroom. In my experience, when someone has a bad cold or flu, the tissues tend to really accumulate.

This is your medical waste disposal expert, wishing you good health and happiness, much joy,success, peace and the absence of any sort of flu neurosis this season.

The Dangers of Medical Waste Disposal

indexThe International Red Cross states: “Hospitals are responsible for the waste they produce. They must ensure that the handling, treatment, and disposal of that waste will not have harmful consenquences for public health or the environment.”

Incineration, which is one of the most commonly used methods for medical waste disposal, does not eliminate toxic substances that are found in the medical waste. Incinerators concentrate hazardous substances, then redistribute them, and the oxygenation even creates new toxins, like dioxins. These chemical substances are known as Hazardous Air Pollutants. (HAPs)

Dioxins are among the most toxic manmade chemicals found on this planet. , apart from plutonium. Dioxins were the contaminant factor in Agent Orange that was used in the Vietnam War. They are a Class 1 human carcinogen. According to the EPA, the risk of cancer in Americans increases a thousand fold because dioxins get stored in the body. The EPA studied dioxins and concluded that there does not appear to be any “safe” level of exposure to dioxins.

Dioxins are very persistent in the environment. They can resist physical, chemical and biological degradation for decades. They cause multiple reproductive and developmental abnormalities. They have been linked to disrupted sexual development, birth defects, and damage to the immune system.

Besides dioxins, which are created by the combination of the chemicals in the medical waste disposal (PVC for one) and the chemicals generated by the burning process, incinerators emit chlorine, mercury, arsenic, lead, cadmium, ammonia and benzene. The heavy metals (mercury, lead and cadmium) are not destroyed by burning. They are just concentrated in the ash and released from the incinerator stacks into the air. The ash is disposed of with general trash and sits around in piles at the landfills.

The heavy metals emitted from the smokestack spread for miles around to be eventually inhaled by local inhabitants, or ingested when they eat produce that was grown in gardens that lay in the vicinity of a medical waste disposal incinerator.

Most of these toxins are both toxic and bio-accumulative, which means that they insidiously accumulate in the human body. They are not combustible, do not degrade, cannot be destroyed. They have been implicated in a broad range of behavioral and emotional problems, especially in children. Some of these problems would be: Autism, ADHD, learning disabilities/difficulties/delinquency. Problems seen more in adults would include dementia, depression, Parkinson’s disease. Autism rates are increased around places where mercury is released into the environment, like coal power plants… and incinerators.

Medical Waste Disposal is particularly notorious because they may also generate and/or emit radioactive toxins and highly infective mutated proteins called prions.

Protests have spurred action against medical waste disposal companies, and incinerators have been shut down. Other, safer methods for medical waste disposal are being examined. Hopefully there will be a solution that will satisfy all parties, but we will have to work hard and work together to reach it.

For much more detailed information about dioxins, and about the damage incinerators can cause us humans who live in the same area/state/country, you can follow these links:

http://www2.epa.gov/dioxin/learn-about-dioxin

https://ec.europa.eu/research/endocrine/pdf//qlk4-ct99-01446.pdf

http://greenaction.org/?p=2408

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/19069-hypocritical-smoke-the-scandal-of-medical-waste-incineration

Medical Waste Disposal: Destination

blog post 2Hopefully, if you’re reading my blog, you’re in the healthcare industry and you have an OSHA-compliant medical waste disposal program in place. You know what sort of medical waste goes into which container or bag, and you already hired a medical waste management company to cart everything away. You receive a paper that says that you have responsibly disposed of the medical waste you generated. You have taken care of the safety of your staff and your patients.

Here’s what happens after that.

Where does the medical waste disposal matter go?

The short answer: To be sterilized.

Once the medical waste disposal matter is sufficiently sterile, it can be chucked in a landfill or even discharged into the sewer system. Basically, it follows the path of other regular, standard, general garbage.

The following are the primary methods used for treatment and sterilization of medical waste:

Incineration:

This entails incinerating (i.e. burning) the medical waste in a medical waste incinerator. This is the simplest way to take care of medical waste disposal matter, because it doesn’t need to be sorted and the burning reduces the volume of the waste and sterilizes it. After incineration, the waste/ash can be dumped in a landfill.

There is a big downside. The EPA is still examining if incineration should continue to be used in the medical waste disposal process. The irony is that during the process of destroying substances that may harm the environment and people in it, the toxins and pollution generated and released by the incinerators are harmful to the environment.

Autoclaves:

These are used 90% of the time for treating medical waste disposal matter. They are closed chambers that apply pressure, steam, and heat to kill microorganisms and sterilize the medical waste.

It’s a two-step process. The medical waste disposal matter is still recognizable after being sterilized, so it needs to be shredded or otherwise manipulated before it can be treated like other trash.

Some facilities use small countertop autoclaves to sterilize their equipment so that it can be reused. Large autoclaves are used to sterilize the medical waste disposal matter that will need further mechanical destruction.

Mechanical/Chemical Disinfection:

This is a process that involves chemical agents for disinfection. (chlorine, for example.) Mostly, this process would be used for liquid wastes, though it can also be used to treat solid waste. Sometimes the medical waste disposal matter is grinded before being exposed to the liquid chemical for disinfection. The grinding ensures that all parts of the waste are sufficiently exposed to the chemical and makes it easier to dispose of the residue. If the material that results is a liquid, it is chucked in the sewer system, while solid residues are disposed of in landfills.

Microwave:

Microwave destruction is an application of microwave technology to disinfect waste. The process begins with shredding. This reduces the volume of the waste. The shredded waste is then mixed with water and put in a microwave unit. The power of the microwave disinfection is that it heats the waste internally. The steam that results from the high temperature neutralize biohazards.

Microwave disinfection is one of the cheapest ways to neutralize biohazards. It reportedly uses lower energy than an incinerator. It is done in one unit. Computerized controls are used to make sure the minimum parameters for disinfection and proper equipment function are kept. The process can be done by unskilled workers. The volume is significantly reduced and the waste can be dumped in a landfill.

Not recommended for getting rid of pathological waste

Irradiation:

This method is not often used. It entails getting the medical waste matter exposed to a source of cobalt. (Cobalt gives off gamma radiations that get rid of all the microbes in the waste matter.) The cost of cobalt, and the cost of operation, is high enough to discourage commercial ventures from using this method to treat their medical waste disposal matter.

There have also been some questions about the process and whether it properly and adequately disinfects the medical waste matter.

Thermal inactivation:

This involves heating the medical waste. The waste is heated to temperatures that kill off infectious agents. It’s usually used to sterilize large volumes of liquid medical/clinical wastes. The chamber of the machine is preheated to a very intense, specific temperature and held for a specific amount of time, then released.

That, in a nutshell, is where the medical waste disposal process takes the medical waste that’s carted off from your facility.

I will be addressing specific methods and some of the concerns associated with them more thoroughly in my next blog.

Are Ariana Grande saliva-topped-donuts considered bio-hazardous waste?

Some bits from the news, for those of you who are busy with important things in life:
“Ariana Grande
 will not have to face legal repercussions for her recent bout of “deliberate food tampering,” as the Riverside County Sheriff’s office put it. According to a statement from the sheriff’s office, Wolfee Donuts elected not to press charges against the singer and backup dancer Ricky Alvarez after they were caught on camera licking donuts on the shop’s counter.”

“Donutgate” already caused some fallout for Grande, who has since apologized (twice), for both the donut licking and the comments she made about the donuts, which included the (presumably hyperbolic) statement “I hate America.”

Wolfee Donuts also suffered in the wake of the incident: Their health department grade went from A to B.”

(As an aside, their grade has been raised back by now.)

From a medical waste disposal perspective: Would saliva-topped donuts be considered bio-hazardous waste?

Bio-hazardous waste, also called infectious waste or biomedical waste, is any waste containing infectious materials or potentially infectious substances such as saliva, semen, or blood. In general, the term “biohazard” describes any biological material (ie, plants, animals, microorganisms, or their byproducts) that may present a potential risk to the health and well-being of humans, animals, or the environment.

There are four categories of biohazardous waste disposal, and four levels of risk.

The four categories of biohazardous waste are:

1. SOLID BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE (non-sharps)

2. LIQUID BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE

3. BIOHAZARDOUS SHARPS

4. PATHOLOGICAL WASTE

What kind of waste, exactly, would be included in each category? We will address this in our next blog. Also, of course- protocol on how to dispose of various forms of biohazardous waste.

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) categorizes various diseases in levels of biohazard, Level 1 being minimum risk and Level 4 being extreme risk. Laboratories and other facilities are categorized as BSL (Biosafety Level) 1-4 or as P1 throughP4 for short (Pathogen or Protection Level). So, if Ariana Grande has any of these various diseases in her system, the donuts would be respectively categorized using the following guidelines:

Bacteria and viruses including Bacillus subtiliscanine hepatitisEscherichia colivaricella (chicken pox), as well as some cell cultures and non-infectious bacteria, would constitute BIOHAZARD LEVEL 1.

At this level, precautions against the biohazardous waste would be minimal. Mostly, protection would involve using gloves and perhaps some facial protection.

Maybe Ariana Grande’s saliva would fall into this category. In a donut shop, gloves and hair nets would be enough to qualify as a good precaution against biohazardous waste. It is not possible to eradicate all bacteria. We do fine with some exposure to some strains of bacteria and viruses. Ariana Grande’s probabl included.

So, not a biohazardous waste concern.

Just a plain hazard concern.

Bacteria and viruses that just cause mild disease to humans, or are difficult to contract via aerosol in a lab setting, such as hepatitis AB, and C, some influenza A strains, Lyme diseasesalmonellamumpsmeaslesscrapiedengue feverHIV, constitute BIOHAZARD LEVEL 2.

Routine diagnostic work with clinical specimens can be done safely at Biosafety Level 2, using Biosafety Level 2 practices and procedures.

BIOHAZARD LEVEL 3: Bacteria and viruses that can cause severe to fatal disease in humans, but for which vaccines or other treatments exist.Some examples would be: anthraxWest Nile virusVenezuelan equine encephalitisSARS virusMERS coronavirushantavirusestuberculosis,typhusRift Valley feverRocky Mountain spotted feveryellow fever, and malaria. Among parasites Plasmodium falciparum, which causes Malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes trypanosomiasis.

BIOHAZARD LEVEL 4: Viruses and bacteria that cause severe to fatal disease in humans, for which vaccines or other treatments are not available. Some examples would include Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic feversMarburg virusEbola virusLassa fever virusCrimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other hemorrhagic diseases. Variola virus (smallpox) is an agent that is worked with at BSL-4 despite the existence of a vaccine, as it has been erradicated.

This level of biohazard would require the use of a positive pressure personnel suit with a segregated air supply. Also, there would be mandatory multiple showers at the entrance and exit to a Level Four biolab,a vacuum room,an ultraviolet light room,an autonomous detection system, and other safety precautions that are designed to destroy all traces of the biohazard. There would also be multiple airlocks to prevent both doors from opening at the same time. All the air and water that enters and exits a Biosafety level 4 lab would go through similar decontamination procedures to avoid any possibility of cross contamination.

Frankly, it could have been fun to see a bunch of pressure suits swarm Wolfee donuts to pick up the contaminated, biohazardous waste donuts that had been licked. It could have been amusing to watch someone come along and create a bigger story than this one will ever be. However, (as far as we know), Ariana Grande’s saliva is hardly more than a level one biohazard waste. It’s the kind of biohazard that we probably encounter about a million times a day, on door handles, computer keyboards, in handshakes… not that anyone wants to think too much into that. Also, if people in white pressure suits would have shown up and swarmed into Wolfee’s donuts, I don’t think anyone- anyone!- would be going in there as a customer in the near future… or maybe forever. Too many Ebola outbreak stories right now… and the kinds of speculations around the neighborhood that are really, really bad for business.

Instead, maybe Wolfee’s should capitalize on the short-lived public interest and create a “Grande saliva donut.” I’m sure they can come up with some fancy footwork on the icing to create a signature product that will attract customers for a while.

Waiting to see how this will all blow over, and who will gain from this incident. (I hope somebody does.)

Please feel free to peruse our site for other blog entries about current medical waste disposal issues.

 

In a single year, an estimated 20 million people, globally, acquired HBV infections from unsafe MEDICAL injections.

blog post 8To me this is a rather scary number. The amount of people injured from unsafe injections and acquired HBV infections is 20 million, and that’s just the beginning. This calculation hasn’t factored in people getting pricked from used needles and other such outbreaks related to Bloodborne Pathogens and unsafe needle use and disposal.  In fact risks may go unreported; 35 hepatitis OUTBREAKS from healthcare settings were reported to the CDC from 2008 to 2012 and furthermore  one outbreak can affect THOUSANDS of people; 35 outbreaks resulted in the notification of more than 100,000 people who needed to be tested for hepatitis. Healthcare workers often do NOT report their sharps injuries; estimates of under-reporting are 22% to 99%.

Now some of these injuries and accident are possibly unavoidable, no matter how much laws, regulations and safeguards are in place accidents can always occur, however, everyone can do their part to help these number decrease, and the first step is knowing and being able to recognize and correct unsafe situations before an accident occurs. The key to this is the OSHA Training program, which is designed to explain and insure that you know everything necessary to stay safe and compliant.

Our OSHA Compliance program is a comprehensive, user friendly program that will train and certify you and your employees in OSHA compliance. In addition it provides step by step instructions and the ability to create a working safety plan, perform safety audits, search and save MSDS’s, ICD’s and more.

For more information visit our OSHA Training page