Category Archives: Drug Take Back

pile of pills

The DEA Has Reached 17 National Prescription Drug Take Back Days!

The DEA held its 17th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 27, 2019.

The idea of the National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is to provide a convenient, responsible, and safe way to get rid of unused or unwanted prescription drugs. It is also a way of spreading information and educating the public about the safe disposal of medications and the potential for their abuse.

The Center for Disease Control reported in 2014 that almost 2 million Americans abused, or were dependent on, prescription opioids. (Most commonly Methadone, Oxycodone and Hydrocodone.) Unused portions of these medications must be disposed of properly to avoid harm and prevent addiction.

Other medications, besides for opioids, must also be properly disposed of.

Some medications are more harmful when misused than others. There are medications that can be fatal in a single dose if taken by a person they weren’t prescribed for. Other side effects of prescription drug abuse range anywhere from mild mental confusion to failure of vital organs.

I Missed the Drug Take Back Day! But I still have Medicine I’d like to get rid of.

A) Visit the DEA website for ideas and temporary drop-off locations in your area.

B) Check the package for disposal directions.

Some medications indicate that they should be flushed down a sink or toilet when no longer needed. Only flush drugs that indicate they are safe to be flushed!!

The FDA has a list of drugs that can be flushed on the FDA website and you can always double check.

For other drugs, try medication disposal kiosks at your local Walgreens. Check if they have a kiosk in your area using the Walgreens Store Locator.

A medication disposal kiosk is a lot like a mailbox. You bring your unused or expired medication and drop it in the slot at no cost to you. It is safe and convenient. The kiosks are available during regular pharmacy hours and you can use them to get rid of prescriptions, prescription and over the counter ointments and creams, liquids, lotions, pet medications, prescription patches, over-the-counter medications and vitamins.

Kiosks do not accept needles, inhalers, aerosol cans, thermometers, hydrogen peroxide, and illegal drugs.

C) Try community programs, like household hazardous waste collection events or medical waste disposal companies that will do a one-time pickup. We’ve compiled a couple of California drop off points for you.

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

feet at 2019 starting line

New Year, Old Crisis: The Opioid Epidemic in 2019

The opioid crisis is still one of the most critical public health challenges of our time period. The death toll is still rising. An estimated 130 people are dying from opioid-related overdose every day.

The Department of Health and Human Services released a plan for dealing with the opioid crisis in 2019.

It has five key points:

  1. Better prevention, treatment and recovery services for addicts.
  2. Developing better methods for pain management.
  3. More quality research on pain and research on addiction.
  4. More attention on overdose-reversing drugs
  5. Get better, more accurate data on the scope of the opioid epidemic.

The Department has $10 billion allocated to put this five-point plan into action.

The Department of Justice Department of Justice is also implementing new and creative policies to fight the opioid scourge.

In 2019, they’re proposing to decrease manufacturing quotas for opioid production.

Time will tell if the quota will go through, as patients who are on opioids may strenuously object to policies that will limit their access to drugs they are currently taking for pain management. So we might see a plethora of petitions and fights over opioid policies this coming year.

The nation’s biggest drugmakers and distributors face a wave of civil lawsuits that could total tens of billions of dollars in damages.

Local governments are suing drug companies that manufacture opioids, distribute them, or sell them to patients. The coming year will see us through the big court fights. The litigation process is going to evolve over the next year. It will likely follow a similar pattern as the lawsuits against tobacco manufacturers. First, States will need to prove that opioids are harmful to patients, that the companies were unequivocally aware of the risks to users, and that the patients could not assume responsibility for the risks because the risks were concealed and patients and prescribers of the drug were not adequately informed of the risks by the manufacturers. Companies will likely be sued for the cost of healthcare and treatment for opioid addiction that the State incurred, or to help defray the cost of opening more addiction treatment centers in States that are desperately strapped for the necessary funds.

So far, the claims are that dozens of companies (manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacies) made billions of dollars flooding the U.S. with prescription pain pills. On top of that, the claim accuses the companies of a concerted effort to mislead the public and physicians about the dangers of opioid medications. One example is Purdue Pharma, who created Oxycontin in the 1990s, marketed it aggressively, and advertised the following:

“In fact, the rate of addiction amongst pain patients who are treated by doctors is much less than one percent…” “These drugs should be used much more than they are for patients in pain.”

There are also smaller lawsuits pending against prescribing Doctors.

Boston U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling has been sending letters to Doctors whose patients died opioid-related deaths within 60 days of being prescribed opioids.

They are reminders and warnings, he says, that his Department is keeping an eye out for ethical prescribing practices of potentially lethal substances.

There have been Doctors indicted for manslaughter over opioid-related deaths, and the coming year will probably see more Doctors in court for their lax prescription practices.

We will be following the various lawsuits.

The United States has been pushing for better regulation of fentanyl in China for years, without much luck.

Maybe 2019 will bring changes in China and their regulatory laws.

Who knows? Although, considering the huge amount of money China is making off fentanyl sales and distribution in China, they probably won’t be so quick to completely cut such a profitable industry.

Maybe in 2019 we’ll find out if that wall between the U.S. and Mexico will ever be finished.

The next 12 months might just redefine the way America thinks about and responds to the opioid epidemic that now claims more than 40,000 lives each year.

This coming year is going to bring more contention and more awareness around the subject of opioids than last year. It’s a trending topic. Government agencies, News reporting agencies, Law Enforcement Agencies, Schools and Community Organizations, are all going to address aspects of the opioid crisis over the coming year. We can all gear up and find a way to help. The opioid crisis is not going away anytime soon. Hopefully the coming year will also bring surprising initiatives and solutions that will drive down the opioid overdose death rates and the rate of overall prescription and addiction.

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

 

 

Cute police cartoon

More Drug Drop-Off Boxes Are Now Available in Police Stations.

Last week, a MedSafe Drug Drop-off box became available in Liberal, Kansas.

A ribbon cutting ceremony hosted by the Liberal Chamber of Commerce took place for the MedSafe box, and officials with the Liberal Area Coalition for Families, including director Sarah Foreman, were on hand for the presentation.

The box came at the heels of a purchase of a Elastec Drug Terminator Incinerator. The purchase was made possible with a donation from Southern Pioneer Electric’s Helping Us Give to Society (HUGS) program.

The $1,500 HUGS donation was matched by CoBank, making a total of $3,000 towards the LPD’s equipment.

Annually, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has its National Prescription Drug Take Back Initiative. The Liberal Police Department takes part in this.

Now, with the additon of the MedSafe box, people can dispose of their unwanted medication whenever it’s convenient for them. It’s available for drop-off Monday through Friday, from 8 to 5.

The MedSafe box is in the lobby. There is no need to check in with anyone. You just walk in to the station, throw in your medication, and leave.

After the medications are dropped in the MedSafe container, a minimum of two employees remove the medication and take it to the new incinerator. The medication is incinerated on the same day.

The Vermont State Police is also joining the ranks of departments that have a secure disposal box available year-round, all week. 

Six of the 10 VSP barracks already have been outfitted with drop boxes. There are more coming.

It’s  just another way for locals to clean out the poison from their medicine cabinets, said Public Safety Comissioner Anderson.

Police stations and State Police barracks across Erie County now have drug take-back boxes.

People in Erie can also  safely deposit expired or unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medication at Erie Police Stations now.

An interactive map that shows where the boxes are located can be found here.

It was created by the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs and includes more than a dozen sites in Erie County and nearly 700 statewide.

At the ribbon cutting ceremony in Liberal, Kansas,  Liberal Area Coalition for Families Director Sarah Foreman spoke about the goals and expectations for the MedSafe box the Station installed.

She said a large problem, at least among young people, is taking prescription medicines from their parents’ medicine cabinets to parties. This creates a danger close in nature to taking illegal drugs. Maybe more dangerous, since the pills are mixed and may be funky due to the expired ingredients.

While having a disposal box doesn’t empirically curb the behavior, she hopes that reducing drug use among teenagers would be one result of installing the drop box.

“I think the goal of any MedSafe disposal is to get either prescribed drugs off the streets, out of the wrong hands, and expired medication also not in the water system, not on the streets, not in dumpsters, but safely disposed of and then incinerated,” she said.

Other dangers of expired and unused medication would be for small children, as well as elderly who may be confused about which type of medication is safe.

Often people don’t know what to do with the expired medications, or don’t get to the drop off locations at drug takeback events, so having a permanent box that is open all week is a great option for disposing of expired or unused medications.

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

lawyer in boxing gloves

Florida Sues Walgreens and CVS for Opioid Distribution

Florida is suing Walgreens and CVS, two of the largest drugstore chains in the nation, among other opioid distributors and producers, for their role in the opioid epidemic.

The state is alleging that Walgreens and CVS added to the national opioid crisis and to the Florida state opioid crisis by selling more painkillers than necessary and for their “unconscionable efforts to increase the demand and supply of opioids into Florida.”

The lawsuit alleges that Walgreens has dispensed billions of doses of opioids in Florida pharmacies since 2006.  In some stores, its opioid sales jumped six-fold in two years.

The lawsuit further alleged that in 2011,  Walgreens’ pharmacies in Florida ordered more than one million dosage units of oxycodone. That’s ten times the average amount.

Five years ago, the company paid $80 million  to resolve a federal investigation that centered on inadequate record keeping of its Florida opioid sales. The inadequate record keeping allowed opioid pills to get to the black market.

The lawsuit revealed that a Walgreens distribution center sold  2.2 million opioid tablets to  its pharmacy in Hudson, a tiny town, population 12,000. That’s about a six month supply for each resident.

In another town, not identified in the lawsuit, Walgreens sold 285,000 pills in a month to a population of 3,000.

It also shipped more than 1.1 million opioid pills to two pharmacies in Fort Pierce— 1.1 million pills each.

In regard to CVS, the lawsuit accuses the company of distributing more than 700 million dosages of opioid meds in the State of Florida through 754 Florida stores between the years of 2006 and 2014.

CVS also paid $22 million to settle allegations that its pharmacists were filling fake opioid prescriptions in 2015.

“Armed with knowledge of their own sales and shipments and industry-wide data, Defendants knew or should have known that the quantity of opioids being distributed in Florida far exceeds the medical need of Florida residents,” the lawsuit said.

CVS and Walgreens are not the only pharmacies being sued in this lawsuit. The lawsuit was filed in May and already includes other opioid distributors like InSys. (They aggressively marketed SubSys, a fentanyl spray.) Also included are opioid manufacturers, like Purdue Pharma, (OxyContin), Endo Pharmaceuticals, (Percocet) and Teva Pharmaceuticals, who manufactures generic drugs.

Walgreens said they don’t comment on pending lawsuits.

Mike DeAngelis, spokesman for CVS, said the lawsuit is “without merit.” He stated that CVS trains its employees to properly shoulder their responsibilities when they are dispensing controlled substances, and that the company gives pharmacists and their assistants tools to detect illegal sales.

“Over the past several years, CVS has taken numerous actions to strengthen our existing safeguards to help address the nation’s opioid epidemic,” DeAnglelis said.

Walgreens and CVS are working to install drug take back kiosks in their pharmacies, where patients can return unused or expired drugs, in an effort to help with the opioid crisis.

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

 

 

 

Drug Take Back Event In Augusta, Georgia. 12/14/2018

The Richmond County Sheriff’s Office will be taking unwanted or expired medication on Friday, December 14th. Deputies will be collecting medication from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Augusta at Doctors Hospital in Augusta. Deputies will be outside of the main entrance of the hospital. The drug take back event will be at:

Doctors Hospital
3651 Wheeler Rd, Augusta, GA 30909
From 8:30 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

You are invited to bring your unused, unwanted or expired medications to this event in order to dispose of them safely and prevent them from posing future hazards.

The Prescription Drug Take Back event helps keep old pills from being abused.

Read more here: Prescription Drug Take Back In Augusta, Georgia

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

say no to drugs

Quick Overview of the Opioid Crisis

On October 26, 2017, President Trump announced that his Administration was declaring the opioid crisis a national Public Health Emergency under federal law, effective immediately. “I am directing all executive agencies to use every appropriate emergency authority to fight the opioid crisis,” the President said.

Declaring the Opioid Crisis a national Public Health Emergency legally authorizes federal, state, tribal, and local authorities to allocate existing personnel and resources toward opioid prevention efforts.

It also waives some key legal inhibitions, ramps up critical public health surveillance, and facilitates greater coordination across federal agencies. Mainly, these agencies and authorities are focusing on the developing the following three solutions:

Money.

 Innovation costs money. All the organizations and government, pharma, and medicine that are working to stem the flow of the opioid crisis need money to put their ideas into practice, so directing funds to all the people working to solve the opioid crisis is going to be a primary concern. Where exactly is the money going to be spent? Each agency has their own list of needs.

Some of the money is to be used for creating more access to addiction treatments, as many patients with opioid addictions simply cannot afford the detox and addiction treatments currently available.     

Another costly way to reduce opioid death is furnishing emergency personnel with naloxone, which is the primary treatment for opioid overdose. Naloxone is costly. The government can force Pharma to slash prices. We’re still working on that- it hasn’t happened yet.

Regulation-.

First of all, going after the bad guys who are importing opioids in an unregulated manner. To this end,  Trump signed the INTERDICT Act in January, 2018. This law directs the Department of Homeland Security to provide additional tools and resources to detect and intercept the supply of illicit fentanyl.

Trump spoke about handing out the Death Penalty to drug dealers.

He also is still emphatic about strengthening the wall between the U.S. and Mexico, which supplies a lot of the US’s illicit drugs.       

Regulation also includes the FDA’s efforts to create better guidelines, reporting systems, and a way to regulate the prescribed opioids in the U.S. Patients requiring certain medications containing opioids are already having a more difficult time getting their prescription refilled, and they are not happy. They are forming groups and creating petitions for medical opioids that will not interfere or limit the patient’s medical treatments.

Education.

 Many addictions start without the knowledge of the person developing the addiction, or without the knowledge of people around them that could have prevented or assisted with the addiction. Explaining the effects of drugs to teenagers is always appropriate.

Giving patients good information about their prescribed medication, and creating a list of alternative ways to treat, control and handle pain is another way to reduce opioid addiction numbers.

Proper disposal of opioids is a very big step toward decreasing the numbers of opioid addiction and death, and it is something everyone can do.

Follow us for more information on the latest innovations, solutions, and news about the opioid crisis.

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

Drug Take Back Event In Oswego, NY. 12/13/2018

State Senator Patty Ritchie and Oswego Health are offering a community event where people can safely dispose of their unused and unwanted medications, including prescription and narcotic medicines.

The event will be held from 2pm –  4pm, Thursday, Decemebr 13th, in the lobby of Oswego Hospital at 110 W 6th St., Oswego NY 13126.

Law enforcement officials and Oswego Health pharmacy staff will be present to assist community members and to answer questions.

Oswego Hospital
110 w 6th St. 
Oswega, NY 13126
Thursday, 12/13/2018
From 2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

You are invited to bring your unused, unwanted or expired medications to this event in order to dispose of them safely and prevent them from posing future hazards.

The Prescription Drug Take Back event helps keep old pills from being abused.

Read more here: Prescription Drug Take Back In Oswego, New York

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

Drug Take Back Event In Kokomo, Indiana. 12/07/2018

The office of Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill and its Mobile Operations Center will visit Kokomo Friday to hold a prescription drug takeback event.

The public is invited to the event, which will be held from 10 am to 2 pm at Ivy Tech Kokomo, which is located 1815 E. Morgan St. in Kokomo, IN. The public is encouraged to bring unused, unwanted or expired medications for safe disposal.

Local law enforcement and members of the Attorney General’s office will be on campus to collect prescription drugs.

The drug take back event will be at:

Ivy Tech Community College
1815 E Morgan St. 
Kokomo, IN 46901
Friday, 12/07/2018
From 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

You are invited to bring your unused, unwanted or expired medications to this event in order to dispose of them safely and prevent them from posing future hazards.

The Prescription Drug Take Back event helps keep old pills from being abused.

Read more here: Prescription Drug Take Back In Kokomo, Indiana

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

stop drugs word collage

State Department will Crack Down on Opioid Import

Much of the efforts to fight the opioid crisis are directed to provide resources, support and education for opioid users or demographics at risk for becoming users (like teenagers.) The Department of State is putting in the effort to address one of the core issues of the opioid epidemic.

A critical piece to stopping opioid abuse is preventing illicit opioids from being available in the first place.

As prescribing opioids becomes a more discerning process, opioid addicts may first turn to alternate sources for the drug before seeking treatment for the addiciton itself. The U.S. Department of State is aiming to stop illicit opioids that are produced overseas from being trafficked into America.

The number of overdose cases that involved synthetic opioids (mostly fentanyl) increased by nearly 640% between 2012 and 2016. In 2016 alone, over 42,000 Americans overdosed on synthetic opioids.

Two milligrams of fentanyl can potentially be lethal.

Most of the fentanyl in the US is sourced from overseas, mostly from China. The majority of heroin in the US comes from Mexico.

These drugs enter the US in a variety of ways and routes. Some are crossing the border overland. Some are shipped in through online orders, slipping through the mail system.

 The State Departments’s INL Bureau is leading U.S. efforts to partner with foreign governments in an effort to reduce illicit drugs and precursor chemicals for cooking the drugs from entering the US.

The INL Bureau is developing a strategy to disrupt the synthetic drug supply chain, in all its new and improved forms, which currently pose a challenge to traditional counternarcotics approaches.

There are new trends in the way the drugs are moved that fostered an increase in heroin use. There have also been many instances of heroin (the natural opioid) being laced with synthetic opioids (like fentanyl), without the user’s knowledge. Fentanyl and other forms of synthetic opioids can be fifty to one hundred times stronger than heroin.

There has to be a new plan that can handle drugs that are produced in secret labs, then bought and sold online, maybe with bitcoin or other virtual currencies that can’t be traced in a traditional manner. Drugs are shipped globally directly to the buyer in small packages that are hard to track and hard to detect. What used to be a drug-trafficking network has turned frequently into a  micro-trafficking network.

The INL Bureau is creating a number of new initiatives to keep up with the dynamic opioid threat in a better fashion. These include:

*Expanding the capacity to globally share and pick up advance electronic data about international mail parcels headed for the United States.

*More support for early warning and global information sharing systems

*Expanding technical assistance for the fine people who develop new ways to detect illicit substances and are working on forensics and cyber investigation

*Spreading education and U.S. expertise with foreign jurisdictions regarding the prevention, treatment ,and recovery programs for drug users.

This will help decrease the demand for the drugs in foreign jurisdictions as well.

Everyone is going to have to work together to meet the challenges posed by the entry of illicit opioids into the United States, including foreign governments, law enforcement agencies, and even the private sector. The State Department is working on advancing cooperation so that the flow of opioids can be stemmed and more lives can be saved.

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

 

Drug Take Back Event In Enterprise, Alabama. 12/06/2018

The Enterprise Police Department will be conducting a prescription drug take back event on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018, at Enterprise City Hall, for safe disposal of unused or expired prescription medications.

From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., area residents are encouraged to bring any unneeded prescription medication to the Enterprise Police Department in City Hall, where it will be bagged and collected for disposal by the Drug Enforcement Agency.

There will be a table will be set up inside the front doors of City Hall on Thursday, where officers will collect any unwanted or expired prescription drugs.

The drug take back event will be at:

Enterprise City Hall
501 S Main St. 
Enterprise, AL 36330
Thursday, 12/06/2018
From 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

You are invited to bring your unused, unwanted or expired medications to this event in order to dispose of them safely and prevent them from posing future hazards.

The Prescription Drug Take Back event helps keep old pills from being abused.

Read more here: Prescription Drug Take Back In Enterprise, Alabama

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California

Drug Take Back In Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Wednesday 12/05/2018

The Indiana Attorney General’s Office will accept your old, unused prescriptions in Lawrenceburg, Indiana on Wednesday, December 5th 2018.

The attorney general’s Mobile Operations Center will be at:

Ivy Tech Community College - Riverfront Campus
50 Walnut St
Lawrenceburg, IN 47025
From 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

You are invited to bring your unused, unwanted or expired medications to this event in order to dispose of them safely and prevent them from posing future hazards.

The Prescription Drug Take Back event helps keep old pills from being abused.

Read more here: Prescription Drug Take Back In L’burg Wednesday

The DEA and Google both provide locators to find your nearest prescription drug take back locations.

Check out The DEA and Google pages below. They contain tools and more info on the ever growing efforts to help people properly dispose of their unused prescription drugs. This is certainly part of the bigger plan to help end the opioid crisis.

DEA’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

Google’s Prescription Drug Take Back Location Tool

We are MedWaste Management – California’s medical waste disposal experts!

Established in 2008, MedWaste Management brings great benefit to the healthcare industry and the general public alike. We publish this blog to to spread useful and practical information to help people stay safe, smart and healthy!

Call us with any questions or to start service at (866) 254-5105. We are always happy to speak!

Check out our services and other great resources in the links below.

Medical Waste Disposal Services 

MedWaste’s Blog Index

Medical Waste Regulations

MedWaste’s Product Store 

Home Generated Medical Waste Drop-Off Points In California